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Biographic Information

Your Name

This section pulls in information you entered when you created your account. Confirm that what appears here is correct; click the Profile Section link to make changes.

Previous Name

If you are sending any documentation or test scores in which your name is listed differently than it appears on your application, select Yes in this section and enter your previous name. 

Examples of previous names include:

  • Birth names (if different from current legal name)
  • Maiden names
  • Nicknames (e.g., "Bob" for Robert, "Beth" for Elizabeth, etc.)
  • "Westernized" names
  • Alternate punctuation (e.g., your name appears with/without a hyphen, apostrophe, or diacritical marking)
  • Alternate spacing (e.g., your name appears with or without specific spaces)
  • Known misspellings (if a document contains a misspelling)

Gender Assigned at Birth

This question is asking about gender assigned at birth, or the assignment and classification of people as male, female, or another gender assigned at birth often based on physical anatomy at birth and/or karyotyping. 

  • Female: Describes a person with a common combination of hormones, chromosomes, and anatomy that are used to assign a female sex at birth. 
  • Male: Describes a person with a common combination of hormones, chromosomes, and anatomy that are used to assign a male sex at birth. 
  • Decline to State: May be selected if the other options do not apply and/or if you do not want to state. 

Gender

This question is asking about your Gender Identity - or one’s internal sense of being male, female, neither of these, both, or other gender(s). Everyone has a gender identity. For transgender people, their sex assigned at birth and their gender identity are not necessarily the same.

If you do not see your gender identity listed or would like to select more than one identity, select Gender Not Listed and enter how you would like to identify. 

For a list of gender identity terms, refer to the Commission on LGBTQ+ website

  • Agender: An umbrella term for people who commonly do not have a gender and/or have a gender that they describe as neutral. Many agender people are trans. 
  • Cisgender: Term for someone who exclusively identifies as their sex assigned at birth. The term cisgender is not indicative of gender expression, sexual orientation, hormonal makeup, physical anatomy, or how one is perceived in daily life. Male and female are two cisgender identities.
    • Male: A person who was assigned male at birth and identities as male
    • Female: A person who was assigned female at birth and identities as female
  • Genderfluid: According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a person who does not identify with a single fixed gender; of or relating to a person having or expressing a fluid or unfixed gender identity. A changing (“fluid”) gender identity and/or presentation.  
  • Genderqueer: An identity commonly used by people who do not identify or express their gender within the gender binary. Those who identify as genderqueer may identify as neither male nor female, may see themselves as outside of or in between the binary gender boxes, or may simply feel restricted by gender labels. Many genderqueer people are cisgender and identify with it as an aesthetic. Not everyone who identifies as genderqueer identifies as trans or non-binary birth.
  • Māhū (Hawaiʻi): In Native Hawaiian culture, this refers to an individual who may be neither male nor female, but carry both male and female characteristics and either assigned male at birth with a female gender identity (māhūwahine) or assigned female at birth with a male gender identity (māhukāne). In contemporary Hawaiʻi, the word is often misappropriated to inaccurately describe people who are gay. In Tahiti, this refers to an individual who is male but identifies and lives as a female. Perhaps considered a third gender.
  • Māhūkāne (Hawaiʻi): A person who identifies as kāne, mentally and/or physically similarly to the western trans man.
  • Māhūwahine (Hawaiʻi): A newly-coined term (2003) for a person who identifies as wahine similarly to the western trans woman.
  • Non-Binary: Umbrella term for all genders other than female/male or woman/man; used as an adjective (e.g., Jesse is a non-binary person). Not all non-binary people identify as trans and not all trans people identify as non-binary. Sometimes (and increasingly), non-binary can be used to describe the aesthetic/presentation/expression of a cisgender or transgender person.
  • Transgender: Encompassing term of many gender identities of those who do not identify or exclusively identify with their sex assigned at birth. The term transgender is not indicative of gender expression, sexual orientation, hormonal makeup, physical anatomy, or how one is perceived in daily life.
    • Trans man/Transgender Male: Trans man generally describes someone assigned female at birth who identifies as a man. This individual may or may not actively identify as trans. It is grammatically and definitionally correct to include a space between trans and man. Often it is good just to use man.
    • Trans woman/Transgender Female: A person whose sex assigned at birth was male but whose gender identity is female. Trans woman generally describes someone assigned male at birth who identifies as a woman. This individual may or may not actively identify as trans. It is grammatically and definitionally correct to include a space between trans and woman. Often it is good just to use woman.

Birth Information

Enter your date of birth in MM/DD/YYYY format. For example, January 7, 1989, would be listed as 01/07/1989. Make sure you enter your date of birth correctly; failure to do so could cause significant delays with matching documentation and test scores.

Then, enter your country, city, state/territory/province, and county of birth. If you are unsure of your county of birth, select N/A

Note: To ensure applicants are entering consistent data for some questions, this application uses pre-populated answer options that are maintained by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). For example, country answer options are derived from ISO 3166, which is the international standard for country codes and codes for their subdivisions.

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